Valentine’s Day is around the corner, which means buying a card, chocolates and flowers will be appearing on to-do lists across the country. Now, it’s true that one card, a box of chocolates and a bouquet may not have much of a carbon impact. So why are we talking about it here in The Green Space column? If we multiply the card by 144 million, the chocolate box by 36 million and the rose by 110 million, we can begin to see how environmental damage could be associated with the occasion. Each of these romantic components come with its own carbon footprint, and what’s worse, the cards are put away in a drawer or tossed, the empty chocolate boxes are trashed, and the flowers don’t last beyond a few days. Let’s start with the flowers. Your bouquet of a dozen red roses comes from the sunny mountainous regions of Columbia and Ecuador to your kitchen table in cold and snowy New England. When we talk about flowers, the biggest sustainability issue is how flowers get from their point of origin to retailers across the country. During most of the year, flowers are shipped on passenger planes, but in the month before Valentine’s Day, hundreds of cargo planes full of flowers fly from the Ande...